Stephanie Mott

Transgender in Right Relationship With God

StephanieMottBy Stephanie Mott

We hear a never-ending, truth-denying, agenda-pursuing chorus of how people should be in right relationship with God. There are at least as many opinions about what that means as there are people saying it should be.

The majority of those opinions seem to focus on who should love whom and what gender we should understand ourselves to be. The opinions, of course, come with a caveat – claiming knowledge for all people of the only appropriate answers to these questions. The answers, of course, have no true relationship to being in right relationship with anything – other than perhaps oppression and fear.

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Trans Youth: Protecting the Persecuted from the Powerful and Privileged

StephanieMottBy Stephanie Mott

“Oh my God”, said the world, to the idea that children are in danger. “We must do something!”, sounded the alarm to take up immediate action, making certain people are protected. Then someone said, “Nothing in this hand.” And people were suddenly unable to see the cruel and horrifying truth that was happening before their eyes.

Conversations and concerns were struck up all over the country about how to protect ourselves from the dangers of people who have the audacity of authenticity. Young transgender human beings who dare to embrace themselves for who they truly are.

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Trans and Gender Non-Conforming: No Longer Afraid of the Light

StephanieMottBy Stephanie Mott

Hello darkness my old friend. I’ve come to talk to you again. These words from the Simon and Garfunkel song, The Sounds of Silence, are a perfect description of the first forty-eight years of my life. The darkness offered the comfort of familiarity and the certainty of anticipated pain.

Throughout those forty-eight years, I believed that this darkness had been thrust upon me. Gifted to me, as it were, by a society that prefers to keep the non-conformers locked up in places where they can’t be seen. Being transgender and living authentically is the definition of non-conformity.

Looking back from some ten years after I left the darkness, I see that as much as the darkness was thrust upon me, I also wrapped myself up in it. Darkness was my security blanket. It protected me from things imaginably and assuredly worse. My relationship with the darkness was the food stuff of survival. It was also the lock on the door that led to the light.

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Antonin Scalia: Someone Called Him Grandpa

StephanieMottBy Stephanie Mott

I have listened in horror as he left me and many other living, breathing human beings to the mercy of those who see us as less than human. And I fully understand the potential ramifications of his death on the balance of the Supreme Court of the United States and the future of our country. But I refuse to see this man, or any other, as a lesser human being.

I have seen the comments on articles and the Facebook posts that make me shake my head in disgust. I have seen the unfeeling harm returned to the place from which it came; like an endless tennis volley in which no one ever wins.

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Ten Steps to Winning the Transgender Bathroom “Debate”

StephanieMottBy Stephanie Mott

  1. Stop Calling It a Debate – If your argument against allowing transgender people to use the bathrooms associated with their gender identity amounts to repeating a lot of garbage that is patently false, it is not a debate. There are truth-tellers and there are liars.
  1. God Said – All ye who are persons of faith AND believe gender identity should be respected, even/especially in bathrooms, please stand up and say so. I know that a lot of you are already doing that. We need a lot more. Please.

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Awakenings, Intersections, and Transgender Activism

StephanieMottBy Stephanie Mott

As the world began to see me as a woman, the world began to take away privilege. I knew male privilege existed. I just didn’t think I was part of the problem. When I let go of the male persona and moved into authenticity as a woman, I couldn’t help but notice the changes in how the world viewed and treated me.

The changes included devaluation of my opinion, preconceptions about my abilities, and having to be more intentional if I wanted to have a voice. Less subtle was the realization that not only was my opinion seen to have less value, but also the sanctity of my body and my life.

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